Malawi

  1. Subcutaneous DMPA (DMPA-SC, brand name Sayana® Press) is all-in-one injectable contraceptive that protects against pregnancy for three months. PATH regularly hosts webinars to share the latest evidence and experience from DMPA-SC research, introduction, and scale-up, including self-injection.For more information, visit www.path.org/dmpa-sc, sign up for our newsletter, or email FPoptions@path.org.
    Published: March 2019
    Type: Resource Page
  2. Thousands of women are now taking charge of their reproductive health through self-injection of the contraceptive subcutaneous DMPA (DMPA-SC, brand name Sayana® Press). In this February 13, 2019 webinar, speakers presented evidence from five countries at different stages of DMPA-SC introduction and scale-up, from earliest (Ghana) to more advanced (Uganda). Speakers also shared insights on applying research findings to program design and delivery. This webinar was hosted by the DMPA-SC Access Collaborative Learning and Action Network.For more information, visit www.path.org/dmpa-sc, sign up for our newsletter, or email FPoptions@path.org.
    Published: February 2019
    Type: Resource Page
  3. Countries have to determine how to make the best use of limited resources. PATH uses health economics to inform countries' decisions about vaccines.
    Published: June 2018
    Type: Article
  4. A chance finding from 20 years ago may have the potential to transform vaccinology.
    Published: August 2017
    Type: Article
  5. Some stories get more comments and likes on social media than others. Here are 5 of our favorites.
    Published: July 2017
    Type: Article
  6. This report describes perspectives and viewpoints of a broad spectrum of key stakeholders in the maternal immunization arena in Malawi. It documents information and lessons learned around maternal immunization including the vaccine policy decision-making process, potential programmatic implications of vaccine delivery for pregnant women, and perceptions and concerns about influenza and influenza vaccine among community members and health workers.
    Published: October 2016
    Type: Resource Page
  7. Getting our new, soft NIFTY cup delivered to preemies in Malawi and Tanzania who can't breastfeed.
    Published: September 2016
    Type: Article
  8. Kenya is working to ensure children are exclusively breastfed. Next up: improving infant and young child feeding practices.
    Published: August 2016
    Type: Article
  9. In Malawi, it took a community of dedicated advocates "making some noise" to get a list of lifesaving medicines approved.
    Published: June 2015
    Type: Article
  10. Introduction: HIV self-testing (HIVST) has the potential to increase uptake of HIV testing among untested populations in subSaharan Africa and is on the brink of scale-up. However, it is unclear to what extent HIVST would be supported by stakeholders, what policy frameworks are in place and how variations between contexts might influence country-preparedness for scale-up. This qualitative study assessed the perceptions of HIVST among stakeholders in three sub-Saharan countries.Methods: Fifty-four key informant interviews were conducted in Kenya (n16), Malawi (n26) and South Africa (n12) with government policy makers, academics, activists, donors, procurement specialists, laboratory practitioners and health providers. A thematic analysis was conducted in each country and a common coding framework allowed for inter-country analysis to identify common and divergent themes across contexts.Results: Respondents welcomed the idea of an accurate, easy-to-use, rapid HIV self-test which could increase testing across all populations. High-risk groups, such as men, Men who have sex with men (MSM), couples and young people in particular, could be targeted through a range of health facility and community-based distribution points. HIVST is already endorsed in Kenya, and political support for scale-up exists in South Africa and Malawi. However, several caveats remain. Further research, policy and ensuing guidelines should consider how to regulate, market and distribute HIVST, ensure quality assurance of tests and human rights, and critically, link testing to appropriate support and treatment services. Low literacy levels in some target groups would also need context-specific consideration before scale up. World Health Organization (WHO) policy and regulatory frameworks are needed to guide the process in those areas which are new or specific to self-testing.Conclusions: Stakeholders in three HIV endemic sub-Saharan countries felt that HIVST will be an important complement to existing community and facility-based testing approaches if accompanied by the same essential components of any HIV testing service, including access to accurate information and linkages to care. While there is an increasingly positive global policy environment regarding HIVST, several implementation and social challenges limit scale-up. There is a need for further research to provide contextual and operational evidence that addresses concerns and contributes to normative WHO guidance.
    Published: March 2015
    Type: Resource Page
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