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Drugs

We continually prove it’s possible to invent and advance affordable and effective medicines that prevent and treat diseases of poverty, like HIV, malaria, diarrheal disease, and infections—and to get them safely to people who need them.

Our Work
39 Articles
39 Articles
39 Articles
  1. Family planning provider training in Uganda
    June 18, 2018

    Training for DMPA-SC, the all-in-one injectable contraceptive

    Several thousands of health workers around the world have been trained to safely provide DMPA-SC injections in clinics, community locations, and villages, and even to support women to self-inject.

  2. A woman self-injects the contraceptive DMPA-SC (brand name Sayana Press)
    June 18, 2018

    Self-injection best practices: designing family planning programs that work

    Research in Uganda and elsewhere has shown that women are able to self-administer DMPA-SC safely and effectively, that they like doing so, and that self-injection helps support women to continue using injectable contraception.

  3. Three smiling women from Sierra Leone
    June 18, 2018

    DMPA-SC advocacy and communications tools: speaking up for greater contraceptive choice

    Family planning advocates can ensure that a country’s policies and funding promote access to all contraceptive options, so women can make an informed and voluntary choice. The Advocacy Pack for Subcutaneous DMPA was designed for advocates around the globe to help increase access to this new injectable contraceptive option.

  4. Community health worker holds subcutaneous DMPA device (DMPA-SC, Sayana Press)
    June 18, 2018

    Practical guidance for DMPA-SC introduction and scale-up

    Family planning leaders can draw from an established base of evidence to integrate DMPA-SC in efforts to address unmet need and increase access to contraception through a range of delivery channels.

  5. In Ukraine, a TB diagnosis is met with cultural stigma and shame, generally associated with lower classes. In reality, people with low immune systems are more vulnerable to TB regardless of class or the assets in their bank accounts. Photo: PATH/Mike Wang
    April 13, 2017

    The surprising consequences of tuberculosis

    A rising tide of virulent tuberculosis in Ukraine meets a new drug and vigilant workers who won’t give up on their patients.

  6. Two young women and two young men stand together in front of a brick wall.
    November 28, 2016

    You have the right to live

    A young woman in the Democratic Republic of the Congo learns to live again, and gives courage to her HIV-positive peers.
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